Marine Mammal Matching

Though preschoolers are unable to yet read, there are several activities they can partake in that promote literacy.

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One of these activities is recognizing letters.

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To encourage focus, and promote an experience that will facilitate their pre-reading skills, your little one played a matching game.

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For this activity, your little matched upper and lowercase letters (placed on plastic crabs) with letter stickers on a piece of paper, and paired each one with it’s match.

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Hurricanes, Rice, and Writing

The preschool years play a key role in the development of literacy. At this age, your budding writers are engaging in the important work of preparing to read and write. Before the formal study of literacy can be acquired, pre-writing and pre-reading skills need to be mastered. One of these skills consists of phonological awareness. Phonological awareness refers to letters representing sounds, that, when strung together, make words that create meaning. There are several ways to encourage phonological awareness. One thing we do daily is a show and tell of different items that begin with the letter of the week. For this particular week, we are learning about the letter H, so each child selected a particular item begininng with the letter H out of a hat. We then discuss the “H” sound that we hear in the word. We also sing silly songs that reinforce our understanding of this letter. For this particular activity, we used unsharpened pencils to rice to create our very own H’s.

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Poker Chips and Patterns

We have been talking about the letter I this week! Using silly songs, props, and a variety of learning activities, we have integrated this letter into our week of the Ichthyosaurus! Using poker chips and the letter I, we combined math and literacy to supplement our awareness of this fascinating vowel. To start, your child was given a color pattern that they were directed to replicate on their letter. They were then instructed to verbally count their items. Teaching patterns and sequencing to young children is an integral component to the concept of emerging mathematics. They facilitate an understanding of one to one correspondence (i.e. matching sets, recognizing groups) and foster one’s ability to count verbally.

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